Writers, Procrastination and Productivity

It gets to all of us. We pin “procrastination” on our tendency to avoid doing the work. Work we feel passionate about. Work we spend months, years, sweating away (okay, maybe not actually sweating, but definitely toiling) in silence with no guarantee anyone will ever read it. No guarantee of financial success or fame or that anything will actually get easier, and a high likelihood that there will be rejection and dislike and questions about how could we write something like that and how we’ve offended some people.

We sit at the screen, check email, Twitter, Facebook (I’ve whittled away entire days — good, open, available writing days — just watching my timeline). We pay bills. Check bank accounts. Find cleaning to do. Organize. Make more coffee. Change music. Eat. Stare out the window at branches being thrashed mercilessly…

We all have days like this. I’m not going to drone on about “writer’s block” or “finding the muse” – you can find plenty of perfectly useful, distracting articles on those. No. Everything is about overcoming procrastination. Beating it into submission (ourselves, actually). Forcing. Talking yourself into or out of things. Facing your fears.

Stop.

What if the days when the writing isn’t flowing and it feels as natural as putting your hand in fire, are intended to be that way?

What if there’s nothing to fight against? What if, instead of thinking we should be able to create, create, create as consistently as we can sit at an office desk and do work by rote, we accepted that creativity has rhythms? That we need to heed those rhythms.

That there is, actually, nothing wrong at all.

You’ve had days when the writing pours through you…faster than you can type, right? Time vanishes. You begin, then wake up from your storyworld 10, 12, 14 hours later, completely surprised to find that so much time has gone by. You’re not even tired — the work so closely aligns with your spirit that you slip back into the essence of timelessness. Those days are gold. Those days you are the channel. The work is the artist.

The work is the artist.

What if on those days when you just can’t bring yourself to begin, it’s not about you at all?

We like to think we are the creators of the work; when in reality, we are receivers, guardians and guides. If we would move out of the way and give heed to the fact that writing in a storyworld is a collaboration between our characters and ourselves, we’d have more grace for those days when our characters need a break, or when we do.

The avoidance? What if it has nothing to do with you and everything to do with whether or not the characters are ready? (Let’s face it, it’s not easy to be a character who has to spend most of his or her time in conflict, pain and fighting. Characters get worn out and need down time, too.) What if it has to do with the Universe needing time to arrange a few thoughts, emotions, reveal something through something that you don’t have access to at this moment?

Granted, there are days when it is your fear that holds you back. Those days you may need to… just begin.

But on those other days when you can’t pinpoint why you can’t get at it – consider that it may not be you at all. Then make a decision to step away from the work. Do something else. It’ll be ready when you come back.

 

 

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About Britta Reque-Dragicevic

Inspiring, nurturing, and giving voice to the human spirit.

Posted on Sunday, in Characters, Inspiration, Internal, Motivation, Obstacles, Process. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Mark Henderson

    Good column Britta. Some days I just have to force the muse though, much as I think my muse wants to be outside walking the dogs, I’d never get things done without planting myself down and starting something!

    • Oh, definitely! I have those days all the time. You just have to force yourself to start. When you’re in the midst of an ongoing project like a novel or script though, you get a feeling for how you work and how the work flows… and there are days when it’s more productive NOT to write than to write. Sometimes it’s a matter of just being available to receive, too. Then jumping into action. Sometimes you have to be in action to receive. 🙂

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